San Vicente unwired

 

My wife’s home in Batangas is finally wireless. After weeks of tinkering with the configurations of the TP-Link’s TL-WR340G, it is now working and the house is now a WiFi zone. And how did I do it? Simple, after several weekends of googling for answers (and finding some hope which actually didn’t work), today I find a no-nonsense tip from a local forum – TipidPC.com. Here’s the instruction by a forum member named borg_ph that solved my lingering problem and that made the connection possible: 

first, reset your TP-Link router to factory settings:
a.) turn off your tp-link and press RESET, keep it pressed.
b.) turn ON tp-link and wait for 6 to 8 seconds bago mo release ang reset
* reset natin router just to make sure there are no misconfiguration.

Next, connect your PC to the router’s LAN port (maski saan basta sa LAN port)
a.) logon to 192.168.1.1 (use admin/admin)
b.) click Network, change 192.168.1.1 to 192.168.2.1
c.) click SAVE

Connect H9200 to TP-Link’s WAN port and check if your PC can surf the internet.

 ***

The problem I encountered here was a compatibility problem between Digitel’s BIDA package’s Prolink H9200AR when connected to the TP-Link WR340G wireless router – which I find ironic that two brands having LINK as the common word don’t actually link to each other.

One time I brought this wireless router back home in Cavite after I got frustrated and consequently surrendered figuring what the problem is all about. But after seconds of connecting it to ours (which is also Digitel but a modem of different brand) it worked plug and play. That confirmed my conclusion that it was indeed about compatibility or a conflict IP issue with that modem in Batangas.

And thanks to the internet, especially TipidPC.com, I can now surf the net when I’m on vacation, unwired.

 

Mood: 3/10 Honks!

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Bad Mini?

 

As one way of saving electricity, I’ve been surfing the web for a couple of days already instead of watching the early morning programs and news on TV. This way I also get to use only one electric fan while being inside our bedroom to watch until when our baby will wake up. So lately I’ve been a fan of ZDnet.com updates. And today’s ZDnet’s email feed caught my full attention.

Just like any other employees in our company, I was among those who are considering buying a laptop after we return our company-issued laptops when work is finally (and totally) over in a few more months. It must be some sort of a denial thing or just the thought of not having anything to tinker with while passing time during the lay off period, but whatever the reason is having one inanimate yet reliable companion during that time will be somehow a relief – just in case talking to your spouse and playtime with your children seems routine (read: boring) already. Hehehe. And that inanimate companion I’m referring to is the mini-laptop or netbook as others prefer to call it.

So among the “filler” activities I’ve done lately to keep me from dozing off in front of my laptop is to check out what might be a good replacement for it. Well isn’t it like talking to your wife upfront and saying that you have someone to replace her already? Just a weird thought. Anyway, after reading about the technical specs, the product features and comparing physical design of each available minis, I’ve set my eyes on the attractive HP Mini. Of course, I’ve sneaked during our mall times just to see the actual items in several stores and I’ve read personal reviews (thru blogs) about each already. During all these, my choice of having the HP Mini 1000 got stronger and stronger. Not until this morning.

The ZDnet article: Who’s got the top 10-inch netbook? hit me like a frantic cry of a baby. I got alarmed especially since this review comes from a reliable person who is affiliated to ZDnet.com. Here are some of the excerpts:

…Laptop Magazine has just posted a roundup of the latest 10-inch netbooks. They tested six netbooks including the Acer Aspire One 10-inch, Asus Eee PC 1000HE, HP Mini 1000, Lenovo IdeaPad S10, MSI Wind U120 and Samsung NC10. Prices range from around $350 for most models to around $450 for the Samsung NC10…

…All of them were able to handle “standard-resolution video, multitask, video-conference and even play World of Warcraft (at low frame rates) reasonably well.” The HP Mini 1000 lagged behind on few tests because it has slower, 4,200rpm hard drive (the rest have 5,400rpm drives), but it basically boils down to design and battery life…

…The HP Mini 1000 and IdeaPad S10 have three-cell batteries, landing them at the bottom of the pile with less than 3 hours of life. The rest have six-cell batteries that lasted anywhere from 4.5 hours (MSI Wind U120 and Acer Aspire One) to more than 7 hours (Asus Eee PC 1000HE)…

…The overall winners were the Asus Eee PC 1000HE and the Acer Aspire One–two brands that already dominate the netbook category. The big surprise? The popular HP Mini came in dead last. Sure, the keyboard is great, but the slow hard drive, fewer ports, and a 3-cell battery are big minuses. Both the HP Mini and the MSI Wind are in sore need of updates…

Ouch! The writer/reviewer from ZDnet ended his review like a boxer’s knockout punch. He hit the HP Mini several times that its recovery seems like next to impossible. Now I’m dumbfounded as well. I feel like all of my time-killing efforts in search of my future laptop have been totally in vain. Now I have to find those PC stores handouts that my ever supporting wife has collected while she follows right behind me as I sneak (and secretly drool) through the attractive computer shops. Ti abi.

 

 

Mood: 3/10 Honks!

Posting From Microsoft Office Word 2007

 

I love Bill Gates. I love Microsoft. No this isn’t obsession (yet), but just a recent appreciation of how MS Word 2007 makes a bloggers life more convenient. I was hesitant at first to use this feature as I’m one paranoid especially when a pops-up and asks me the about my personal info including my password. Previous training (and common sense) tells me that passwords should never be shared. And as one quote says, “If you want others to keep your secret, keep it yourself.” – this is just one of the so many clichés that I keep inside my paranoid gray matter.

I dread option this more than not having a helmet while on a motorcycle.

I dread option this more than not having a helmet while on a motorcycle.

Come to think of it though at some point of our lives, and if some are still not aware of it, we just have to give our trusts to other people especially now that information technology is an unavoidable thing. Gone are the days when browsing through files in the filing cabinet is cumbersome. And nowadays it’s not only those nerdy (pardon the word, but some people appreciate it when they called nerdy) IT people that holds your life’s info in their hands. There are others who are hook to that imaginary camera around as if you’re one Big Brother contestant. And so you’ll wonder who these people are anyhow? Let me name a few:

  • 1. Network admins – they have the privilege to access your emails, blogs and any other IT related matter. I consider them the highest threat in the exchange of information. That’s why most of them are among the highest paid positions other than nurses.
  • 2. Credit card company – they know how you spend, know what you buy (and compulsion), what’s your salary and any other financial info that you’ve submitted to them when you applied for that unarmed robber inside your wallet – i.e., your credit card.
  • 3. Your friendly doctor or physician – they know your body more than you do – unless you’ve personally probed your behind to look for lumps (ouch!).
  • 4. NBI (or FBI in the US) – they know your fingers (print) better and has the capability to exchange it with someone else’s. So be extra friendly with your finger print technicians.
  • 5. Morgue personnel – morbid as it may seem, they are the least of your worries for unavoidable embarrassment. You know what I’m talking about. At least, your next of kin will be the one who will entrust you to them.

That’s funny, but when I typed the title above, I never knew that I’ll somehow end up relating it to the last bullet. It must be a result of another bloody CSI episode this week. Anyway, and to get back to the topic, since its imminent that I’ll be spending quite some time blogging in the new days to come, I finally have to give in once again to entrusting my secret alphanumeric code – A.K.A passwords – to those behind this MS Word 2007 feature of publishing a blog directly without having to open an internet browser. It’s a compromise, I give my trust to them, and they give me the “publish” menu in my MS Word in return. That’s just the way it works and how can I complain?

This is not wordstar anymore.

This is not wordstar anymore.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

And today, while the Jetman is probably still fast asleep after setting the first english channel crossing by using his wing invention, I on the other hand is celebrating in my own petty way for having my first blog published thru MS Office Word 2007.

Not Guinness book-worthy, but a record nevertheless.

Not Guinness book-worthy, but a record nevertheless.

 

The Chain Game

I’ve always talked about the benefits we’ve been getting with the continuous improvement of how we communicate with one another through the Internet and computers. Everything from the basic things we’ve done before has its own evolution nowadays.Each though has its own pros and cons. And with the split second rate of how we get in contact with each other, the exchange of information gets quickly across the globe and more often than not it gets immediate reactions. To the gullible it is a life changing moment.

Today I’m talking about the pesky chain letters. Just like an everlasting terrorist threat, this one affects everyone. No one is free from it. It is on how you deal with it that makes the difference.

I really don’t know the exact reason behind these mails – why it was created by the originator in the first place. It could have been sent in good faith and purpose. That is to inspire, motivate or spread good news. Or it could have been created just as plain pranks. The latter might be more true with the advent of prank reality shows such as Punk’d and Jackass.

What would you do? Forward or Delete?

What would you do? Forward or Delete?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anyway, this hasn’t stopped. Until now I still get it regularly in my inbox and most of it was neither from susiexxx@horny.com nor from pass2survive@faithinme.net but majority are from my friends whom I knew very well. And it always surprises me every time when one who has been sending me pornographic pictures would later on send me an email requesting me to pass on to every contacts a slide show with the Immaculate Concepcion’s picture on it just because some celebrity died after ignoring it. Ti abi. I believe in change and conversion, but believe me this one is not about it.

The reasons behind this instantaneous forwarding – pass this to 5 people in 30 seconds and you’ll see your life change – in my opinion may be the following:
• Very shallow faith. Ever wondered if someone from the heavens did actually track if you send the religious email to everyone?
• Lack of logic. Who in his right mind from Microsoft or Intel will give you $10000 cash or the latest computer just by forwarding an email.
• Getting even. “Damn, I got scared with that. Might as well send it to others”.
• 10GPBS office internet connection. Kung sabagay, why not. Very naughty.

I’m not a quick “deleter”. I normally read emails especially if it does come from the persons I know. I’m not even saying that all chain letters are bad. Most of it actually makes sense. So what I always do is to read the mail and if I think it is good enough, I “share” it to my friends but without the part that I know might get someone anxious (or worse, scared) knowing that he’s been asked by someone from the high heavens to pass it to others or get ran over by a truck on his next trip to work. OR that perhaps a CEO from Nokia is shaking his head for a recipient’s stupidity of passing off a good deal by ignoring the request to forward the enticing free N90 email to friends.

Wait. I got an email from Paris Hilton…Hey, that’s an indecent proposal but it just needs me to forward to 3 friends in 10 seconds.

“Dear Mo, Mojo and Andi, please forward this to picture and you’ll get the time of your life…..”

Photo credit: unknown

My Blog Machine 2.0

Every new beginning comes from other beginning’s end…” (Closing Time by Semisonic).

Finally, my old Blog Machine has to go. The 5+ year old Pentium III 800 MHz PC had to end his throne in our bedroom and give way to what I’d call my Blog Machine 2.0 powered with one of the latest Intel Core 2 Duo 2.13 GHz PC.

The old machine had been a part of our life since it was given to us for free. During its early days it has opened our eyes to the wonderful world of the Internet. It has helped us appreciate the then famous (or infamous) Napster. Despite enduring the dragging speed of dial-up connection, I had endured over the night downloading of what I’ve known before as just free music (It’s now technically known as piracy). I still can recall one person begging me to keep my connection open just to download Midge Ure’s Dear God – which happens to be one of my most coveted songs even until know (hint: 80’s fan).

Of course the old Intel machine introduced me likewise to one of the wonders of Web 2.0 – web blogging or just blog. Since I’ve got this frustration of being a writer, I finally found one medium to share my thoughts and practice my writing skills, if I may call it (or worse, if I actually got it). It was in this machine, where I drafted and published my first blog.

As everything will come to an end, the old guy was laid to rest. Some of its parts were taken out (i.e. cannibalized) for the new guy. Some were given away, to maybe meet other old PC’s that hopefully start other people to learn the basics and be awed by the World Wide Web. If there’s a PC heaven, I know his soul will be there.

For the new guy, he still has got a lot to prove. It’s been with us for just 2 days but so far the promises of an Intel Dual Core processor haven’t failed and continue to amaze me with its power. I’ve already made it to download applications from the Internet, rip music and capture videos from our Sony handycam. All of which were done simultaneously (multitasked). The result was just great. No glitch. Just pure performance. Yet. If only writing skills improve together with the upgrade of a PC.

Oh, before I forget. I’m now playing a new game in this PC. It’s the modern, action packed, adrenaline pumping, graphics-unforgiving game of….Spider Solitaire. LOL. I’m growing old. Ti abi.

Internet for Oldies

This year’s Christmas vacation, we’re introducing (if not intimidating) our parents to the modern world of computers. It has been a week already and most of it were spent on buying a new pc, setting it up for internet use and an almost never ending tutorial for our mother on how it will be used to connect to the internet.

I can still remember that more than a couple of years ago, my wife and I gave my mother a cellphone for her to join the SMS generation. I can still picture her laughing out loud upon discovering that she had just sent a text message to herself. Luckily after some patient sessions with my wife (with the unnecessary texting even when they are a couple of feet apart) she learned the basics slowly and was able to send us messages while we are at the airport on our way back by the end of our holiday vacation.

Now is her time to transition to the more complex world wide web.

Fortunately with some organizational and training skills I acquired from work, I got to somehow manage and make the sessions less stressful by labeling almost every wires on the back panel, capturing actual hardware pictures and screenshots. All of which were then transferred to a Word document as a training material, printed and had it available for her to refer from it while doing the start-up from the very beginning – from plugging the AC cord, powering up the UPS, powering the CPU, logging into Windows XP and then connecting to the internet via dial up.

And it doesn’t stop there yet. Once connected, more questions poured in. “What is an icon? What’s a double click? Why double click on some and single click on the others? What’s a domain? Why’s there an @ character? What’s a shortcut? Why’s the Window’s Start button got the Turn Off computer option? Why did the message turned to Read (status) when she hasn’t even finished reading it?”. And these, are just a few of the long list of “WH” and “How” questions that I never knew would come.

Despite all that, I think my patience is paying off. She’s already sent a couple of emails to my sister abroad and some to a family friend. She’s already started surfing the web and had already filed some of her Favorites which she checked a couple of times if it is still there. Just to make sure, I guess. I think my “relocating building” analogy is a bad one.

Though seeing the progress happening, today I checked some books in our local bookstore expecting to see some computer self-help book applicable for people like my mother. Well I saw Basic C++, How to Upgrade your PC, Do-It-Yourself: Fixing a PC and other books with Fundamentals written on it which when I opened contained a lot of computer jargons that would only reassure me that the new PC at home will never be opened again once we leave home back to work.

I come near a book from local authors “Internet Fundamentals” but lacked the basics on the PC’s operation. If I would have expanded my self-authored material, I could have made some bucks out of it. It’s so frustrating, but so far I haven’t seen a book with a direct approach to Internet for Oldies. Hopefully, I’ll chance upon on it at Powerbooks once I get back to Manila.

I’ve got few more days here in Bacolod. Tomorrow I’ll be teaching my father. Fingers crossed.

My Blog Machine is Up!

Other than not having time to compose (properly or not) my blogs, my Blog Machine bogged down due to a defective UPS. This is what I’m now calling my HP VL400 Desktop which runs on Intel Pentium III 800Mhz, 128MB SDRAM 133Mhz bus speed. More than 5 years ago, this could have put me on the bragging rights level if you compare it to other computers of its time.

Sadly though, technology is cruel. This week your fast, the next couple of weeks your slower than slow. In this world of F1-like “Giga” CPUs, mine is that one car that would have retired sooner even before the other cars have settled in their pole positions prior to the race start.

But fear not! The Blog machine is at least still good for word processing, which is all I need to do my blogs. And btw, it is still good for the adrenalin pumping, heart stopping, mind boggling game of…Solitaire! At least I’ve got something to do while waiting for the next blog page to load – i.e on my 56Kbps internet connection (actually, it has never or rarely reached that speed! Sucker!). ti abi!